Annie Camila

FOLK TALES

Annie Camila
FOLK TALES
El Silbón

El Silbón

Pachamama

Pachamama

El Silbón

El Silbón

La Llorona

La Llorona

Pachamama

Pachamama

El Silbón

El Silbón

By referencing theatrical photography, this series explores character-making through Latin American folk tales. Each person was told the different tales and they were photographed as they silently decided to subtly yet emotively embody one of the characters they were told about. Later telling me who they were representing. These folk tales are usually about supernatural beings, often “almas en pena” literally souls in pain. The folk tales were that of El Silbón (The Whistler), a horrible boy who ended up killing his father and who was then mauled by dogs for his deed. He walks the countryside whistling, and if the whistle is far that means he’s close by. Then there is La Llorona (The Weeping Woman) who killed her children, or lost them and cries as she looks for them by the river. These two are omens of misfortune and death. Lastly there is Pachamama, who is unlike the other unfortunate tales is the goddess revered by Indigenous people of the Andes, Mother Earth, a positive story. 

Folk Tales, 2015, 16x20, Inkjet on Luster.